Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/60318

TitleEffects of particle size and surface chemistry on the dispersion of graphite nanoplates in polypropylene composites
Author(s)Santos, Raquel M.
Mould, Sacha Trevelyan
Formánek, Petr
Paiva, M. C.
Covas, J. A.
Issue date24-Feb-2018
PublisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
JournalPolymers
Abstract(s)Carbon nanoparticles tend to form agglomerates with considerable cohesive strength, depending on particle morphology and chemistry, thus presenting different dispersion challenges. The present work studies the dispersion of three types of graphite nanoplates (GnP) with different flake sizes and bulk densities in a polypropylene melt, using a prototype extensional mixer under comparable hydrodynamic stresses. The nanoparticles were also chemically functionalized by covalent bonding polymer molecules to their surface, and the dispersion of the functionalized GnP was studied. The effects of stress relaxation on dispersion were also analyzed. Samples were removed along the mixer length, and characterized by microscopy and dielectric spectroscopy. A lower dispersion rate was observed for GnP with larger surface area and higher bulk density. Significant re-agglomeration was observed for all materials when the deformation rate was reduced. The polypropylene-functionalized GnP, characterized by increased compatibility with the polymer matrix, showed similar dispersion effects, albeit presenting slightly higher dispersion levels. All the composites exhibit dielectric behavior, however, the alternate current (AC) conductivity is systematically higher for the composites with larger flake GnP.
TypeArticle
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/1822/60318
DOI10.3390/polym10020222
ISSN2073-4360
Peer-Reviewedyes
AccessOpen access
Appears in Collections:BUM - MDPI
IPC - Artigos em revistas científicas internacionais com arbitragem

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