Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/53991

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dc.contributor.authorPinu, Farhana R.por
dc.contributor.authorGranucci, Ninnapor
dc.contributor.authorDaniell, Jamespor
dc.contributor.authorHan, Ting-Lipor
dc.contributor.authorCarneiro, Sóniapor
dc.contributor.authorRocha, I.por
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Jenspor
dc.contributor.authorVillas-Boas, Silas G.por
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-05T17:49:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-05T17:49:04Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-
dc.identifier.citationPinu, Farhana R.; Granucci, Ninna; Daniell, James; Han, Ting-Li; Carneiro, Sónia; Rocha, Isabel; Nielsen, Jens; Villas-Boas, Silas G., Metabolite secretion in microorganisms: the theory of metabolic overflow put to the test. Metabolomics, 14(4), 43-43, 2018por
dc.identifier.issn1573-3890por
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1822/53991-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Microbial cells secrete many metabolites during growth, including important intermediates of the central carbon metabolism. This has not been taken into account by researchers when modeling microbial metabolism for metabolic engineering and systems biology studies. Materials and Methods The uptake of metabolites by microorganisms is well studied, but our knowledge of how and why they secrete different intracellular compounds is poor. The secretion of metabolites by microbial cells has traditionally been regarded as a consequence of intracellular metabolic overflow. Conclusions Here, we provide evidence based on time-series metabolomics data that microbial cells eliminate some metabolites in response to environmental cues, independent of metabolic overflow. Moreover, we review the different mechanisms of metabolite secretion and explore how this knowledge can benefit metabolic modeling and engineering.por
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are thankful to Mia Jullig for assistance with Fig. 2. Callaghan Innovation and Bioresource Processing Alliance provided PhD stipends for James Daniell and Ninna Granucci respectively.por
dc.language.isoengpor
dc.publisherSpringer Naturepor
dc.rightsopenAccesspor
dc.subjectMicrobial metabolismpor
dc.subjectMicroorganismspor
dc.subjectActive effluxpor
dc.subjectSecretionpor
dc.subjectMetabolic engineeringpor
dc.subjectMetabolic modellingpor
dc.subjectSystems biologypor
dc.subjectMetabolic modelingpor
dc.titleMetabolite secretion in microorganisms: the theory of metabolic overflow put to the testpor
dc.typearticle-
dc.peerreviewedyespor
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.springer.com/journal/11306/aboutpor
dc.commentsCEB47518por
oaire.citationStartPage43por
oaire.citationEndPage43por
oaire.citationIssue4por
oaire.citationConferencePlaceGermany-
oaire.citationVolume14por
dc.date.updated2018-04-05T08:14:37Z-
dc.identifier.essn1573-3882por
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11306-018-1339-7por
dc.identifier.pmid30830324por
dc.description.publicationversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionpor
dc.subject.wosScience & Technologypor
sdum.journalMetabolomicspor
Appears in Collections:CEB - Publicações em Revistas/Séries Internacionais / Publications in International Journals/Series

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