Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/53859

TitleLay definitions of happiness across nations: The Primacy of inner harmony and relational connectedness
Author(s)Delle Fave, Antonella
Brdar, Ingrid
Wissing, Marie P.
Araujo, Ulisses
Castro Solano, Alejandro
Freire, Teresa
Del Rocio Hernandez-Pozo, Maria
Jose, Paul
Martos, Tamas
Nafstad, Hilde E.
Nakamura, Jeanne
Singh, Kamlesh
Soosai-Nathan, Lawrence
KeywordsHappiness
Lay definitions
Adulthood
Culture
Inner harmony
Relationships
Interconnectedness
Issue date2016
PublisherFrontiers Media SA
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
CitationDelle Fave, A., Brdar, I., Wissing, M. P., Araujo, U., Castro Solano, A., Freire, T., ... & Nakamura, J. (2016). Lay definitions of happiness across nations: The primacy of inner harmony and relational connectedness. Frontiers in psychology, 7, 30
Abstract(s)In well-being research the term happiness is often used as synonymous with life satisfaction. However, little is known about lay people's understanding of happiness. Building on the available literature, this study explored lay definitions of happiness across nations and cultural dimensions, analyzing their components and relationship with participants' demographic features. Participants were 2799 adults (age range = 30-60, 50% women) living in urban areas of Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, and United States. They completed the Eudaimonic and Hedonic Happiness Investigation (EHHI), reporting, among other information, their own definition of happiness. Answers comprised definitions referring to a broad range of life domains, covering both the contextual-social sphere and the psychological sphere. Across countries and with little variation by age and gender, inner harmony predominated among psychological definitions, and family and social relationships among contextual definitions. Whereas relationships are widely acknowledged as basic happiness components, inner harmony is substantially neglected. Nevertheless, its cross-national primacy, together with relations, is consistent with the view of an ontological interconnectedness characterizing living systems, shared by several conceptual frameworks across disciplines and cultures. At the methodological level, these findings suggest the potential of a bottom-up, mixed method approach to contextualize psychological dimensions within culture and lay understanding.
TypeArticle
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/1822/53859
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00030
ISSN1664-1078
Publisher versionhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00030/full
Peer-Reviewedyes
AccessRestricted access (Author)
Appears in Collections:CIPsi - Artigos (Papers)

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