Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/46477

TitleHuman rights: has the present economic crisis proven Bentham was right?
Author(s)Calheiros, Maria Clara
KeywordsBentham
Economic crisis
Utilitarianism
Issue date2015
PublisherInitia Via
CitationCALHEIROS, Clara (2015) "Human rights: has the present economic crisis proven Bentham was right?", in Human Rights, Rule of Law and the Contemporary Social Challenges in Complex Societies: Proceedings of the XXVI World Congress of Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy of the Internationale Vereinigunf für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie. ISBN 978-85-64912-59-5 (e-book). Belo Horizonte, Initia Via.
Abstract(s)In recent years several southern European countries have become submerged by an economic crisis which has led to controversial legal changes. Moreover, in countries such as Portugal or Spain, people’s rights, once considered well established and undisputed, are now seen as something the State cannot afford to grant to its citizens. In this paper, the author reviews some of Jeremy Bentham’s philosophical arguments regarding the French declaration of rights as a starting point from which to examine the contemporary discourse that has been used to support those legal changes. At the end of the day, the main focus of this paper is to observe to what extent Bentham's criticisms on human rights remain relevant and are, in fact, being used.
TypeConference paper
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/1822/46477
e-ISBN978-85-64912-59-5
Peer-Reviewedyes
AccessOpen access
Appears in Collections:ED/DH-CII - Comunicações e conferências

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