Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/40891

TitleHydrogels and cell based therapies in spinal cord injury regeneration
Author(s)Silva, Rita Catarina Assunção Ribeiro
Gomes, Eduardo Domingos Correia
Sousa, Nuno
Silva, Nuno André Martins
Salgado, A. J.
Issue date2015
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation
JournalStem cells international
Abstract(s)Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a central nervous system- (CNS-) related disorder for which there is yet no successful treatment. Within the past several years, cell-based therapies have been explored for SCI repair, including the use of pluripotent human stem cells, and a number of adult-derived stem and mature cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and Schwann cells. Although promising, cell transplantation is often overturned by the poor cell survival in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Alternatively, the therapeutic role of different cells has been used in tissue engineering approaches by engrafting cells with biomaterials. The latter have the advantages of physically mimicking the CNS tissue, while promoting a more permissive environment for cell survival, growth, and differentiation. The roles of both cell- and biomaterial-based therapies as single therapeutic approaches for SCI repair will be discussed in this review. Moreover, as the multifactorial inhibitory environment of a SCI suggests that combinatorial approaches would be more effective, the importance of using biomaterials as cell carriers will be herein highlighted, as well as the recent advances and achievements of these promising tools for neural tissue regeneration.
TypeArticle
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/1822/40891
DOI10.1155/2015/948040
ISSN1687-966X
Publisher versionhttp://www.hindawi.com/
Peer-Reviewedyes
AccessOpen access
Appears in Collections:ICVS - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais com Referee

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